Consumers, Vehicles and Energy Integration reports

Published: 14 November 2019

Introduction

The Consumers, Vehicles and Energy Integration (CVEI) project was launched in 2016 to deliver unique and detailed insight on mainstream consumer behaviour when using and charging battery and hybrid electric vehicles, to understand the changes that will be required of existing infrastructure with the growth in low carbon transport.

An innovative and ambitious project commissioned and funded by the Energy Technologies Institute (ETI) and delivered by a cross-industry consortium led by TRL.

Energy Systems Catapult provided technical expertise and assurance to the project and will take forward the data and models to provide future development of the CVEI capability from the ETI legacy.

In total, 20 reports were delivered as part of the CVEI project (all available below).

In addition, a final report bringing together the findings of CVEI and complimentary research from across the sector was delivered following the completion of the CVEI project.

Key points

The main findings include:

  • 95% of Battery Electric Vehicles drivers and 85% with Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles chose smart charging over dumb charging, to automatically avoid charging at times of peak grid demand or when electricity is most expensive.
  • Mainstream consumers trialing all three types of car said they were willing to pay more for BEVs or PHEVs over an ICE vehicle, as long as the savings on running costs delivered a payback in fewer than 5 years.

Vehicle Uptake insights

  • People were willing to pay an extra £4.70 in upfront cost (compared to petrol car) per £1/yr saving in running costs – i.e. payback in 4.7 years.
  • 90% of mainstream consumers would consider a Battery Electric Vehicles as a main car if its range was increased to 300 miles or a PHEV with 100 miles of range; while 50% would consider a BEV if the range was 200 miles.
  • Younger men (under 34) most likely to adopt PHEVs, middle-aged (40-60 years old) male or female most likely to adopt BEVs, older women (over 60) least likely to adopt PHEV or EV.

Charging Behaviour insights

  • Mainstream consumers typically charge at peak times for the electricity system (4-7pm) unless there is an incentive not to do so.
  • Both user-managed and supplier-managed charging was able to shift demand to later in the evening.
  • Mainstream consumers prefer smart charging over simply plugging in and charging straightaway, even if the saving from doing so was relatively low (e.g. £12 a year).

The Outputs

CVEI – Final Analysis of Technology, Commercial and Market Building Blocks for Energy Infrastructure

CVEI – Final Analysis of Technology, Commercial and Market Building Blocks for Energy Infrastructure (Excel model)

CVEI – Market Design and System Integration (full report)

CVEI – Market Design and System Integration (summary report)

CVEI – Stage 2 Trial Design, Methodology and Business Case

CVEI – Consumer attitudes and behaviours report

CVEI – Battery Cost and Performance and Battery Management System Capability Report and Battery Database

CVEI – Battery Cost and Performance and Battery Management System Capability Report and Battery Database (Excel model)

CVEI – Battery State of Health Model

CVEI – Battery State of Health Model (Excel model)

CVEI – Summary of approach, conceptual design and key research questions

CVEI – Initial Analysis of Technology, Commercial and Market Building Blocks for Energy Infrastructure

CVEI – Initial Analysis of Technology, Commercial and Market Building Blocks for Energy Infrastructure (Excel model)

CVEI – Supplementary Details of Design, Materials and Management Arrangements for Consumer Trials

CVEI – Fleet Study Report

CVEI – Consumer Uptake Trial Report Mainstream consumers’ attitudes and willingness to adopt BEVs and PHEVs

CVEI – Consumer Charging Trials Report Mainstream consumers’ attitudes and willingness to adopt BEVs and PHEVs

CVEI – Demand Management Aggregator Framework

CVEI – Market Design and System Integration Report